The Student News Site of St. Joseph's University

The Hawk News

The Student News Site of St. Joseph's University

The Hawk News

The Student News Site of St. Joseph's University

The Hawk News

Timeline of the 2020 Presidential Election

GRAPHIC%3A+CASEY+WOOD+23%2FTHE+HAWK
GRAPHIC: CASEY WOOD ’23/THE HAWK

Election officials have determined that presidential nominee Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris are the president-elect and vice president-elect of the U.S.

They won 75,629,199 of the popular vote and 290 electoral votes, while U.S. President Donald Trump got 71,059,432 of the popular vote and 214 electoral votes. While the votes were still being counted, the Trump administration filed lawsuits in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Nevada and Georgia in an attempt to stop the states from counting their votes, claiming thousands of votes should be disqualified and demanding a recount of the votes. 

In order to break down a long and tumultuous election, The Hawk compiled a timeline of the events since Election Day on Tuesday, Nov. 3.

Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020

6 a.m. EST: Polling sites first open on the East Coast in Maine, New Jersey, New York, Virginia, Kentucky and Connecticut.

9 a.m.: All states in the continental U.S. opened their voting sites.

12 p.m.: Voting sites open in Hawaii, the last U.S. state to open its polls.

6 p.m.: The first polls close in sections of Indiana and Kentucky, followed by the rest of the East Coast, by 8 p.m.

11 p.m.: Multiple states called for both Biden and Trump. Biden wins most of New England, as well as Virginia and Illinois. Trump wins in Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee, among other states. 

Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020

2:50 a.m.: The Associated Press projects that Arizona’s 11 electoral votes will go to Biden.

1 p.m.-8 p.m.: The Trump campaign announces their intention to file multiple lawsuits against Michigan, where they are requesting the state to stop the vote counting until their campaign could supervise and review the ballots themselves. Specifically, they requested to review the ballots in Georgia and Philadelphia, where the campaign is challenging a policy that poll workers must stand at least 25 feet away from the ballot counting. “Count Every Vote” marches begin across the U.S.

6:00 p.m.: The Associated Press announces that Biden has won Michigan and Wisconsin for a combined 26 electoral votes, putting him at 264, just six away from the 270 needed to win the election.

Thursday Nov. 5, 2020

8 a.m.: Georgia, Nevada, Pennsylvania and North Carolina, all swing states, continue to count their in-person and mail-in ballots.

Friday Nov. 6, 2020

Approximately 8 a.m.: Biden surpassed President Trump in Georgia and Pennsylvania. The country waits for Nevada, Georgia and Pennsylvania to finish counting their in-person and mail-in ballots. Biden only needs Nevada’s nine electoral votes to win the race.

Saturday Nov. 7, 2020

11:25 a.m.: The Associated Press officially names Joe Biden and Kamala Harris as the president-elect and vice president-elect, respectively, after Biden wins his home state of Pennsylvania and its 20 electoral votes.

Thousands of Philadelphians took to the street near Independence Mall in celebration after the announcement that Philadelphia voters had secured the state’s electoral votes for Biden’s election win. 

8:30 p.m.: Harris addresses the nation for the first time as the vice president-elect in Wilmington Delaware. Just 10 minutes later, Biden addresses the nation for the first time as president-elect. President Trump has not yet conceded the race.

Friday Nov. 13, 2020

The Trump Administration has filed a total of 16 lawsuits claiming election fraud since election day on Nov. 3. Trump lost in the courts in both Michigan and Pennsylvania, and withdrew his legal challenge in Arizona.

The ballots have all been officially counted. Georgia is called for Biden, bringing his total electoral votes to 306, and South Carolina is called for Trump, bringing his total electoral votes to 232, and confirming Joe Biden as the next president of the U.S. President Trump has not conceded the race.

Monday Nov. 23, 2020

Head of the General Services Administration (GSA) Emily Murphy said in a letter to President-elect Joe Biden on Monday that her office is ready to begin the formal presidential transition. President Trump thanked Murphy and the GSA in a tweet, saying that he recommends her team “do what needs to be done with regard to initial protocols”, but maintained that “our case STRONGLY continues, we will keep up the good fight”.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Hawk News

Your donation will support the student journalists of St. Joseph's University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Hawk News

Comments (0)

All The Hawk News Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *