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The Hawk News

The Student News Site of St. Joseph's University

The Hawk News

The Student News Site of St. Joseph's University

The Hawk News

We are revolution radio

Green Day makes a triumphant return to the charts with their latest release

After nearly four years of radio silence, Green Day burst back onto the music scene with their newest album, “Revolution Radio,” on Oct. 7. While Green Day has been known for making albums about adolescence, rebellion, and everything in between, “Revolution Radio” introduces a sense of maturity while maintaining the dynamism that fans know and love.

The album opens with the poignant acoustic guitar and wistful lyrics of “Somewhere Now,” which explains the tribulations associated with growing up. It is one of the many songs on that album that references war and soldiers, a pattern that continues with the next song “Bang Bang.” As the title suggests, “Bang Bang” is an explosive single, with Armstrong’s chilling lyrics encapsulating the mindset of a mass shooter.

The next song, “Revolution Radio,” parallels “Bang Bang” in multiple ways. This song was written after Armstrong marched in a protest against Darren Wilson, the policeman who was not indicted for Michael Brown’s murder, and the fast-paced electric guitar and rebellious lyrics flawlessly showcase the emotions of the protest.

Another song addressing police brutality is “Say Goodbye.” With its message about protest, its harmonies, and background vocals, fans are reminded of Green Day’s “Holiday” from the groundbreaking album “American Idiot.” The next song, “Outlaws,” recalls both “American Idiot” and “21st Century Breakdown” with its lyrics about young love and its sense of sadness. However, there is a smattering of lighthearted songs that revert back to the days of youth, titled “Youngblood,” “Bouncing off the Wall,” and “Too Dumb to Die.” All of these songs have an upbeat melody and reflect on young love, teenage carelessness, and simply feeling uncomfortable in your own skin, making the songs relatable to younger audiences.

The next song, “Still Breathing” delivers a message of hope, using morbid metaphors but contrasting them with the idea that “I’m still alive… still breathing.” While this song’s sound leans more towards pop music, the song “Troubled Times” solidifies Green Day’s punk image. This song reflects heavily on society, asking rhetorical questions guaranteed to get its listeners inspired to change the world, or even just to change themselves.

The final songs, to me, pay homage to two of Green Day’s popular songs. “Forever Now” is lengthy and multifaceted like “Jesus of Suburbia,” but the difference here is that the song spans Billie’s entire life. The song begins with Billie “freaking out” about the world and his origin, then he reiterates the album’s theme of revolution, and ends with a flawless transition into a reprise of “Somewhere Now.” The album concludes with “Ordinary World,” which is reminiscent of their touching song, “Time of Your Life” with its evocative lyrics and acoustic sound.

Overall, the entire album was designed for listeners to experience inspiration, heartbreak, and a renewed sense of rebellion. But most importantly, it reminds audiences to never stay stagnant when the world needs to be changed.

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